Specials for your Furface
Rescue
To Rescuers
Newsletter
Spay/Neuter
Calendar of Events
Dog Stuff
Cat Stuff
Breed Banning
In Memory
Ways to Help
Pet Adoption
Training Tips
Memorials
Other Rescue Groups
Helpful Links

 

"On judgment day if God should say, "Did you clean your house today?"  I will say, "I did not, I played with my dogs and I forgot."  And I believe He will say, “Well done”.

Great Tips

ABC's of Bite Prevention

Good Information

Always Wear ID

Hot Weather Tip

Ways to ID Your Dog

Toys for Your Dog

Missing Dog

Grooming

A Caution About Ingredients

Nose To Tail Exam

Always Wear ID

Even though you think it will never happen to you, don't take a chance.  You're dog could come up missing.  Proper identification is essential to getting your dog back.  He should always wear a conventional collar and identification tag.  Choose a sturdy collar with an elastic insert, or one with a "breakaway" feature (a clasp that opens when pulled hard so he won't be strangled if it catches on something like a branch or fence.  The collar should be tight enough so it won't slip over Fido's ears unless it's stretched, but loose enough to fit two fingers underneath.  Never remove the collar unless you replace it with a training collar for training purposes.  (A training collar, sometimes called a choke chain, can bring death to your dog under the wrong circumstances.  NEVER leave one on an unattended dog!!!)

Back to top
==================

Ways To ID Your Dog

A range of ID tags are available, from engraved to handwritten. There are also small screw-apart barrels that can hold folded paper. Include only essential information on any tag: your address and one or two reliable telephone numbers with answering machines.

The disadvantage of collars for identification is that they can come off. Consider a second, more permanent form: the microchip. Implanted by your vet, the microchip can be scanned by an animal shelter or vet to give the name of the registry where your number is on file. This is not foolproof, though. Some smaller shelters may not have scanners and those that do may not be able to read chips from diverse manufacturers until they are all standardized. So, to be on the safe side, put a collar on your dog as well. You may save him a trip to the shelter by allowing whoever finds him to simply call you directly.

Make sure you always have a few clear, close-up and recent photos of your dog, showing his face straight on, as well as some of his entire body, especially of any identifying features. Vital for "lost" posters, photos also help identify pets at animal shelters and pounds.

Back to top
==================

Missing Dog

If your dog is missing, go public. Ask all your neighbors, especially children, if they have seen your dog and to keep an eye out for him. Offer a reward and advertise. Place a good photo of him in the center of a poster with large, clear lettering saying "Reward," "Lost Dog," and giving your dog's breed, color, and any distinguishing marks, and a reliable phone number or two. Head to the copy center and make copies; color ones are best. Hand out posters to neighbors. Ask local store owners if you can put one in their window or at their cash register. Go far and wide; many dogs are found miles from home. Take out a classified ad in your local paper repeating the information on the posters, and check the "Found" ads every day.

Find out the animal control agency responsible for your area, as well as any other shelters, pounds, humane associations and vet clinics in your area, and visit them daily. If possible, go into the stray dog department yourself. Look carefully and consult your photos: Your dog may be dirty, hidden in the back of your cage and too stressed even to recognize your voice. Leave photos of your dog with the staff, but keep visiting since many shelters are understaffed and can't check every new arrival against the "lost" list. Ask each one about any other places you should check. And don't give up! Sometimes dogs turn up months after they're lost.

Back to top
==================

Hot Weather Tip

 Don't throw away that used milk carton. Wash it out and add water to it. Put it into your freezer and let the water freeze. You can use the ice in the carton (yes you'll have to cut the carton off of the ice....BE CAREFUL) to cool down your dog's water. (works best for water containers that are outside)

You can also put the cartoon inside rabbit cages that are outside to help keep the rabbits from overheating.

Do your outside dogs a favor too and cool them off daily with water or buy a child size pool and keep it filled for them to play in.

Back to top
==================

Toys For Your Dogs

 You can buy all kinds of great toys for your dogs at your local Goodwill or Thrift Stores. Normally, you'll only find stuffed animals, but if your dog is like mine they will LOVE stuffed animals. You usually only pay anywhere from a nickel to a dollar per toy.  If you do buy from one of these stores wash and dry the toys before giving them to your pets and be aware of things on the toy that a dog can get off and choke on like eyes.

Back to top
==================

Grooming

You owe it to your dog to keep his coat free of tangles, knots, and burrs.  If you do not like brushing, get a short-haired dog, no matter how cute the one with the long hair looks.  Mats pull on the skin and cause sores.  Left on to long, the mat can even pull out, removing the hair with it.

If you dog does get a mat, you can get a special tool, the mat splitter, to cut off matted and tangled clumps of fur and to remove burrs wedged into the undercoat.  To avoid nicking the skin, only cut out a mat with scissors if you can slide a comb between the mat and skin; then carefully cut over the comb.  Otherwise, seek the help of a professional groomer.

Back to top
==================

A Caution About Ingredients

 Some recipes or foods may be high in salt, or contain other ingredients that may be unhealthy for a dog's diet. When in doubt, always check with your vet. Here are some possible ingredient substitutes to consider:

  •  Salt substitutes include low-sodium salts, sea salt, or you may want to leave salt out completely if it is an added ingredient.

  •  Substitutes for dairy items include goat’s milk, powdered milk, or one of the lactose-free milks available on today's market.  The sodium content of the substitute item needs to be checked also.

  •  Some consider corn to be difficult for a dog to digest; try substituting flour instead. Rice flour, for instance, is extremely easy for a dog to digest.

  •  Bouillons have a high salt content, so try substituting meat juice (or broth) from one of your meals.  Another substitute can be made by putting small amounts of cooked meat in a blender and adding enough water to liquefy.  Be sure to refrigerate these treats.

How To Make
Puppy Pie

Take one puppy, roll and play until lightly pampered, then add the following ingredients....

1 cup patience....

1 cup understanding....

1 pinch correction....

1 cup hard work....

2 cups praise.

1 1/2 cups fun.

Blend well. Heat with warmth of your heart until raised or until puppy has doubled in size. Mix with owner until consistency is such that owner and puppy are one.

 If you have any other suggestions for substitutes, please let us know.  

Also, please keep in mind that bread or cheese that has gone bad is not good for your dog. Many moldy foods that have been refrigerated can cause profound muscle tremors and seizures. So, if it's not good enough for you to eat, don't give it to Fido. Throw it away! Also, moldy walnuts can be a source of the same toxin, Penitrem A, produced by a fungus, and found in moldy dairy products.  

  Back to top
==================

Nose To Tail Exam

Your pet can’t come to you and tell you he feels bad.  It’s up to you to keep a close eye on him and catch problems early.  Give your pet a weekly nose to tail exam.

   Back to top
==================

  Back to Neat Dog Stuff

 

 

This site Copyright©2002, 2003, 2004 Northeast Arkansans for Animals
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Site designed by Julia Thyer
For more info contact jwebs@ritternet.com