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Health Tips

 

The tips below come from people who have used them with success.  Please consult your veterinarian before you try anything.

Poison Hot Line

Drooling

Moldy Food

Dry Skin & Dander

Heartworms

Petproof Your Cabinets

Basic First Aide Kit

Plastic or Ceramic Bowls

For a Healthy Coat

Electrical Wires

Nose-to-Tail Exam

Heat Dangers

Holiday Eating Tips

Fleas

Ticks

 Hot Spots

Stool & Heartworm Checks

Vaccinations Your Dog Needs

The Dreaded Disease: Parvo

Parasites; worms

Demodectic Mange

Sarcoptic Mange

Ringworm

Poison Hot Line

ASPCA helps vets and pets.  Most puppies and many adult dogs will chew on plant foliage out of curiosity, boredom, or an attempt to induce vomiting.  Trouble is, many of the chewed-on plants are poisonous.

 Pets don't limit that strange eating habits to plants; they will ingest substances that smell good, even though those substances can make them sick or worse.  Chocolate, anti-freeze, and pesticides are some of the common household materials that can cause severe reactions and death.

House plants; aloe vera, dieffenbachia, draecena, asparagus fern, rubber plant, scheffera, and poinsettia and outdoor favorites azalea, rhododendron, hibiscus, and lily of the valley are among dozens of plants that can cause a variety of symptoms for dogs.  Even apple seeds and cherry pits can poison a pet.

But help is available.  the National Animal Poison Control Center, a division of the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, is only a phone call away every hour of every day of every week.  Center veterinarians and veterinary toxicologists have up-to-the minute information on toxicity levels, antidotes, treatments, and prognosis based on more than 250,000 cases involving pesticides, drugs, plants, metals, and other exposures in pets, livestock and wildlife.  These specialists provide advice to animal owners and confer with veterinarians about poison exposures.

If you suspect your pet has been poisoned take him/her to the vet immediately.  If you are not able to get to a veterinarian, gather the following information -- your name, address, and telephone number; the species, breed, age, sex, and weight of each animal affected; the substance the animal ingested if known; the time that has elapsed since ingestion; and the symptoms the animal is showing.  then call your veterinarian or the NAPCC:

NAPCC has three telephone numbers for easy access:

  • (900) 680-0000 costs $20 for the first five minutes and $2.95 for each additional minute billed to your telephone

  • 800-548-2423 and

  • 888-426-4435 are credit-card only numbers for $30 per case.  Only master Card, Visa, American Express, and Discover cards are accepted.

The center also has an animal product safety service for manufacturers of veterinary, agricultural and chemical products.  this service provides a toll-free number to be printed on product labels and literature so that toxicity information and treatment advice are available to purchasers.  There is no charge for calls made to the number provided on the product.  this service also keeps case records, compiles quarterly reports, and works with manufacturers to increase product safety.

For additional information about the poison control center, you can go to their web address here.

If you have reason to suspect that your pet may have been exposed to something toxic, either internally or externally, call them immediately and an ASPCA veterinarian specially trained to assist pet owners or other vets will help you.

 This is the only dedicated animal poison control hotline in the world manned by veterinarians,  not telephone operators. The number is staffed 24/7.

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 Drooling

If your pet suddenly starts drooling when he hasn't before, first check his mouth.  He could have a foreign object lodged, or there could be a gum infection or a chipped tooth.  Drooling could also be caused by poison (household chemicals, pesticides, etc.) or, in rare cases, by rabies or other diseases.  In any case, sudden drooling can be serious and should be checked by your vet.

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Moldy Foods

That bread or cheese that has gone bad is not good for your dog.  Many moldy foods that have been refrigerated can cause profound muscle tremors and seizures.  So, if it's not good enough for you to eat...don't give it to Fido, throw it away.  Also, moldy walnuts can be a source of the same toxin, Penitrem A, produced by a fungus, and found in moldy dairy products.

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 Dry Skin and Dander

 You can use diluted Murphy's soap to bathe your dog if your dog suffers from dry skin, dander or even some allergies. The Murphy's soap will clean your dog as well as soothe it's skin.  Always be sure to rinse the dog well.

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Petproof your Cabinets

 Remember to close your cabinets when you are finished looking inside them. Pets, like children, are inquisitive.  Medicine cabinets and kitchen cabinets can hold products that are dangerous to your pets.  If your pet can open cabinets then you will need to install childproof latches. They are very inexpensive and worth your piece of mind.

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Plastic Bowls or Cheap Ceramic Bowls

 These bowls have been implicated as a health concern because the plastic may leach into the food. All plastics release some undetectable fumes, especially when heated. This out gassing means the fumes can pass into the foods that are served or stored in the bowl or container. Stainless steel or glass bowls are recommended.

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For a healthy coat…

Give your dog a daily dose of Safflower, Corn, Soybean or Cotton Seed Oil in their food (1 teaspoon) this really helps them to have a great looking coat and reduces hair loss.

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Cover Those Electrical Wires

Pets are killed every year from chewing on electrical wires, especially puppies.  If you have a pet that likes to chew through electrical wires try covering them with a wide strip of electrical tape or spray exposed wires with pet repellant.

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Nose-to-Tail Exam

Your pet can’t come to you and tell you he feels bad.  It’s up to you to keep a close eye on him and catch problems early.  Give your pet a weekly nose to tail exam.  Check his eyes and ears.  Rub him all over to make sure there are no lumps.  Check between his toes.  If you do this weekly, you'll notice if something appears early, maybe in time to do something before it becomes to late.

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Heat Dangers

Because many states allow only seeing eye or assistance dogs to be brought into stores or malls, some people take their dogs along but leave them in the car. This can be deadly.

A little heat outside the car can quickly make it very hot inside. On a summer's day of only 85 degrees, for example, even keeping the windows slightly open won't stop the inside temperature from climbing to 102 degrees in 10 minutes, to 120 degrees in 20 minutes. A dog whose body temperature rises to 107-108 degrees will within a very short time suffer irreparable brain damage -- or even death.

For a dog overcome by heat exhaustion, immediately soak him or her down with water and take to a veterinarian as soon as possible

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Hot Spots

To help when he/she has developed some bad hot spots or worse yet has raw and itchy skin from flea allergies. Murphy's Oil Soap is an all natural product and is wonderful (even daily if necessary) for irritated skin without drying it out? It also will save $$$$$$. Shar Pei owners have been using it for years.

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Stool & Heartworm Checks

Dogs can be plagued by a wide variety of internal and external parasites.  No matter how clean an environment your pet lives in, they are often exposed to internal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms, coccidia and tapeworms.  Severe parasite infestations can cause weight loss, anemia, vomiting, diarrhea and sometimes death.  Annual heartworm checks are important to ensure your pets stay heartworm free -- EVEN IF THEY ARE ON HEARTWORM PREVENTATIVE!!!  Even indoor animals can be exposed to mosquitoes and contract heartworms; outdoor pets are at a higher risk.  Pets that are infected with heartworms may not show signs until there has been significant damage to the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys by these worms.  there is an expensive treatment for heartworms, but without the treatment, heartworms are usually a slow, painful, and fatal disease.  Heartworm preventatives usually keep dogs heartworm free when they are started on prevention at an early age.  Older dogs can be kept heartworm free by putting them on a preventive after a negative heartworm check.  NEVER PUT A DOG ON HEARTWORM PREVENTATIVE WITHOUT CONSULTING A VET!!!  A dog that has advanced heartworms can be killed by going on the preventative.  Once they are started on a heartworm preventive, dogs should be kept on the preventive year round.

A complete and thorough annual check by your veterinarian can be an early detention for sickness and disease.  Since animals can be born with glands and organs that do not function properly, pets of any age group can benefit from CBC's, serum chemistries and urinalysis which are given by your vet.  (For more information on heartworms, click here.)

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